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City struggles to protect New Yorkers in need

For years, overloaded caseworkers at APS have struggled and sometimes failed to provide state-mandated services to the city’s most vulnerable adults. In at least two instances over the past several years, city officials determined that those failures contributed to the death of an APS client, according to disciplinary records obtained through an open records request. Illustration: Vincent Panzeca

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Housing the unwanted: WNYC interview

New York World reporter Jie Jenny Zou stopped by WNYC’s All Things Considered to discuss the challenge the state faces in effectively enforcing residency restrictions for sex offenders while still assisting their reentry into society.    

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Housing the unwanted

Clusters of sex offenders living in boarding houses, cheap motels, and homeless shelters have become all too common in the decade since New York first implemented statewide residency restrictions for many sex offenders under parole supervision. These clusters can place additional burdens on low-income communities already struggling with high unemployment and poverty rates. And many don’t provide the stable, safe environments research has shown to be critical for successful reentry.

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When judges are judged

A review by the New York World found the commission often does not remove judges even when they’ve violated the constitutionally guaranteed right to due process or manipulated the outcome of cases. In addition, much of the commission’s work is conducted in secret. New York is one of only 15 states that conduct judicial disciplinary hearings in private. And in many cases, the name of the sanctioned judge and the nature of the misconduct are never made public. Photo: Flickr/ssalonso

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